First Cuddle

Yitzchak Meir is still breathing on his own, but with extra oxygen. The doctors still call his condition a “coma”, but we were quite amazed by his behaviour today. Ella was able to pick up and cuddle Yitzchak Meir for the first time, ever. She also gave him a bath. Amazingly, he opened up his…

Breathing Easier

Yitzchak Meir is now breathing on his own without any help from a respirator. His vital signs (heart, blood pressure) continue to be good, indicating that his body is very strong. He is also feeding through a tube directly to his stomach (and we heard him make noises — burps — for the first time).…

Doctors With Doubts

Yitzchak Meir is back at Misgav Ledach. His condition is, unfortunately, not improving. The doctors are not sure of his future condition, or even if he will survive in the short term. All that is left is asking God to have compassion on Yitzchak Meir and the entire Seltzer family.

Report From Shaare Tzedek

Yitzchak Meir went to Shaare Tzedek hospital for EEG and CT scans. Doctors are not pleased with the results. We attempted to check him in, but balked when we heard that insurance would not cover the admission.

And He Shall Be Called…

Baby has been named Yitzchak Meir ben Lev haLevi. Yitzchak Meir Silverstein was his 2nd great-grandfather, and was a religious Jew. We hope in the merit of this name that he will come out of his coma and will have a refuah Shelaymah.

ICU Update

Baby is off the respirator. All vital signs are good. Drugged with phenol barbital (an anti-convulsant), so not able to tell if dulled reactions are still due to birth trauma, drugs, or other problems. CAT scan scheduled on Monday.

Shalom Zachor

Shalom Zachor (“party” in honor of new baby) held in the Seltzer Residence for the new baby. Prayers and good wishes are offered.

Tehillim

50 women attend a psalm/tehillim session in Ramat Beit Shemesh to pray for the baby.

Baby is Born

Baby is born. Weighs 4.2kg/9.25 lbs. Due to a traumatic birth (3.5 hours of pushing) the baby is not breathing on its own and is immediately brought to the ICU (intensive care unit) and put on a respirator.